Daniel Ricciardo

Daniel Ricciardo

#3 DANIEL RICCIARDO

Daniel Ricciardo is one of Formula One’s most universally liked drivers. A smiling assassin out of the car and a Honey Badger inside it, the Australian is in search of his first World Championship after several race victories in recent years.


Full Name Daniel Joseph Ricciardo
Nationality Australian
Age 28
Date of Birth 1st July 1989
First Race 2011 British Grand Prix
First Win 2014 Canadian Grand Prix
Wins 7
Poles 2
Podiums 29
Fastest Laps 12

With both his mum and dad’s sides of the family having Italian heritage, Daniel Ricciardo was born in Perth, Western Australia in 1989. His father was a motorsport enthusiast, and some of Daniel’s motorsport earliest memories are of watching his father on track. He cites Ayrton Senna as one of his idols, and took up karting at the age of nine. After performing respectably in outdated karts at competitions, Ricciardo won a scholarship into the Formula BMW Asian series in 2006. He took two wins and finished third in the championship and, after a brief appearance in Formula BMW UK, moved to the European and Italian championships of Formula Renault. He failed to score a point in the European series, but finished seventh overall in the Italian series with one podium finish. He stayed in the series for a second year, but focussed on the European and Western European championships. He won the title in the latter with eight wins from fifteen races, and finished runner-up to Valtteri Bottas in the European championship.

Also during 2008, Ricciardo made his Formula Three début, where he qualified eighth and finished an impressive sixth. Having joined the Red Bull young driver program, he competed in British Formula 3 in 2009 and won the title with six race victories. He gained his first F1 experience at the end of 2009 testing for Red Bull Racing, where his raw speed shone through and he was signed as one of Red Bull and Toro Rosso’s test and reserve drivers for 2010, alongside Brendon Hartley. For 2010 Ricciardo entered the Formula Renault 3.5 Series and, despite an injury sustained over the winter, impressed from the outset, scoring four wins and eventually finishing runner-up to Mikhail Aleshin in the title hunt. He continued in the series in 2011, until he stepped up to F1.

Ricciardo made his F1 bow at the British Grand Prix in 2011 after Red Bull placed him at the Hispania Racing Team. The team were backmarkers, but it was a pressure free environment for Ricciardo to put in some mileage at the top tier of motorsport. He was signed to join the Toro Rosso team for the 2012 season and scored his first F1 points at the opening round of the year. He impressively qualified sixth in Bahrain, but the car was rarely good enough to convert qualifying speed into race pace. He scored ten points over the season and finished eighteenth in the championship. He remained at the team in 2013 and doubled his points tally, moving up to fourteenth overall.

With fellow Australian Mark Webber retiring at the end of 2013, Red Bull announced Ricciardo as his replacement. He impressed from his début with the team, where he finished in second place at his home event, before being disqualified for a technical infringement. Over the course of the season, he consistently out-performed his four-time World Champion team-mate Sebastian Vettel and took three wins, the first of which came at a chaotic Canadian race, before back-to-back victories followed in Hungary and Belgium. He finished the year third in the championship, the best of the rest behind the dominant Mercedes pairing. The car struggled more in 2015, with Ricciardo able to score just two podiums. In 2016, he scored his maiden pole at Monaco and kept his cool against new team-mate Max Verstappen. After two years of waiting, he finally took his fourth Grand Prix victory, in Malaysia.

Daniel Ricciardo’s 2017 got off to the worst possible start. His home Grand Prix in Australia saw him crash out in Q3 on the Saturday and then retire from the race with mechanical trouble on Sunday. Move forward a few rounds, and Ricciardo took a surprise victory at Baku in a chaotic Grand Prix, in which he impressively overtook three cars in one move at the end of the pit straight. He further proved his reputation as one of the best overtakers with his sublime pass on Kimi Raikkonen in Monza and with his his charge through the field from the back in Brazil. Despite a raft of technical issues, which saw him retire from three of the last four races of the year, the Australian scored nine podiums over the course of the season.

2018 could be Ricciardo’s last season at Red Bull. Talk of his next contract, which he admits will likely be the most important of his career, will be a major point of discussion over the coming months. On track, he’ll need to keep an eye on the other side of the garage. Max Verstappen out-qualified him on thirteen occasions in 2017 – the first time in his career that Ricciardo has been beaten in Qualifying over the course of a season, even if the margins were slim. Are more race victories and a championship battle on the horizon for the Honey Badger this season?


DANIEL RICCIARDO’S F1 RECORD

Year Team Place Wins Poles Podiums
2011 HRT 27th (0 points) 0 0 0
2012 Toro Rosso 18th (10 points) 0 0 0
2013 Toro Rosso 14th (20 points) 0 0 0
2014 Red Bull 3rd (238 points) 3 0 8
2015 Red Bull 8th (92 points) 0 0 2
2016 Red Bull 3rd (256 points) 1 1 8
2017 Red Bull 5th (200 points) 1 0 9
2018 Red Bull