2019 Canadian GP Qualifying Analysis

2019 Canadian GP Qualifying Analysis

Sebastian Vettel stormed to pole position with a new Track Record at the Circuit Gilles Villeneuve. We take a look at all the stats and stories from Saturday at the Canadian Grand Prix!


Q  U  A  L  I  F  Y  I  N  G     R  E  C  A  P

  • Vettel storms to first pole in 17 races
  • Ricciardo impresses with fourth
  • Bottas only sixth on the grid
  • Magnussen crashes out in Q2, Verstappen also eliminated as a result
  • Both McLarens reach Q3 for second time this year
  • Raikkonen eliminated in Q1 for first time since Austria 2015

The Ultimate Pace

FASTEST
SECTOR 1
FASTEST
SECTOR 2
FASTEST
SECTOR 3
19.323
Lewis Hamilton
22.369
Lewis Hamilton
28.449
Sebastian Vettel

Lewis Hamilton was fastest of any driver in the first sectors, but Ferrari – and Sebastian Vettel in particular made the difference in the final sector. While Hamilton was 0.034 seconds faster than Vettel in Sector 1 and 0.049 seconds faster than Charles Leclerc in Sector 2, Vettel set the fastest time through Sector 3 by almost two tenths and was 0.234 seconds faster than the closest Mercedes through that part of the track. Adding the best three sector times together gives a lap time just under a tenth faster than Vettel’s actual pole lap time. 

POLE
LAP
ULTIMATE
PACE
1:10.240 1:10.141

By adding each drivers’ best three sector times together, we can get an idea of who put a lap together when it mattered, and who failed to pull all three sectors into one fast lap. Robert Kubica was the only driver to deliver all three of his best sector times on his fastest qualifying lap – though this only gave a time which was almost eight tenths slower than team-mate George Russell’s actual qualifying time. Vettel’s pole lap was close to his best potential time – he set personal bests in the first two sectors on his pole lap but lost a fraction of time in  Sector 3, meaning his actual lap was 0.007 seconds slower than his best potential time. Interestingly, Valtteri Bottas and Daniel Ricciardo’s best potential lap times were the exact same – a 1:10.970. The lap times are compared in the table below.

QualifiedDriverQualifying TimeUltimate PaceDifferenceUltimate Pace Position
1Sebastian Vettel70.2470.233-0.0071
2Lewis Hamilton70.44670.375-0.0712
3Charles Leclerc70.9270.534-0.3863
4Daniel Ricciardo71.07170.97-0.1014
5Pierre Gasly71.07971.005-0.0746
6Valtteri Bottas71.09570.97-0.1254
7Nico Hulkenberg71.32471.28-0.0447
8Lando Norris71.73571.569-0.16611
9Carlos Sainz71.57271.408-0.1649
10Kevin Magnussen71.78671.547-0.23910
11Max Verstappen71.61971.383-0.2368
12Daniil Kvyat71.92171.752-0.16913
13Antonio Giovinazzi72.12271.923-0.19915
14Alexander Albon72.0271.748-0.27212
15Romain Grosjean72.10971.877-0.23214
16Sergio Perez72.19772.148-0.04918
17Kimi Raikkonen72.2372.147-0.08317
18Lance Stroll72.26672.081-0.18516
19George Russell73.61773.503-0.11419
20Robert Kubica74.39374.393020

The team-mate battles

Based on Q1 lap times, the closest team-mate battle in qualifying for the Canadian Grand Prix looked set to be at Haas, where Kevin Magnussen lapped just two thousandths quicker than Romain Grosjean. Magnussen’s Q2-ending crash meant that team-mate Grosjean was unable to get a lap time in during the second session after making a mistake on his first attempt. This left the Frenchman qualifying in fifteenth and Magnussen unable to take part in Q3. The largest gap between team-mates in a session was at McLaren, where Lando Norris qualified over two seconds faster than Carlos Sainz in Q3. Sainz had been faster than Norris in both Q1 and Q2, and, set a faster time than his team-mate in all three sectors during the qualifying hour. The Spaniard failed to put a fast lap together when it mattered in Q3, allowing Norris to out-qualify him for the fourth time this year.

Largest gaps in each session:

Q1: George Russell 0.776s faster than Robert Kubica

Q2: Pierre Gasly 0.604s faster than Max Verstappen

Q3: Lando Norris 2.118s faster than Carlos Sainz

Gap between team-mates in last session where each driver set a time:

Team Gap Winner
Mercedes 0.655 Hamilton
Ferrari 0.680 Vettel
Red Bull 0.604 Gasly
Renault 0.253 Ricciardo
Haas 0.002 Magnussen
McLaren 2.118 Norris
Racing Point 0.069 Perez
Alfa Romeo 0.108 Giovinazzi
Toro Rosso 0.272 Kvyat
Williams 0.776 Russell

Looking at each driver’s ultimate pace also offers an interesting glimpse into who was fastest in each sector in each team. The results can be found in the table below. Despite being out-qualified by their team-mates, Carlos Sainz, Lance Stroll and Alexander Albon all had better potential lap times than the drivers in the other side of the garage:

Driver FASTEST
SECTOR 1
FASTEST
SECTOR 2
FASTEST
SECTOR 3
FASTEST
OVERALL
Mercedes HAMILTON HAMILTON HAMILTON HAMILTON
Ferrari VETTEL LECLERC VETTEL VETTEL
Red Bull GASLY GASLY GASLY GASLY
Renault RICCIARDO RICCIARDO RICCIARDO RICCIARDO
Haas MAGNUSSEN MAGNUSSEN MAGNUSSEN MAGNUSSEN
McLaren SAINZ SAINZ SAINZ SAINZ
Racing Point PEREZ PEREZ STROLL STROLL
Alfa Romeo GIOVINAZZI GIOVINAZZI GIOVINAZZI GIOVINAZZI
Toro Rosso ALBON ALBON KVYAT ALBON
Williams RUSSELL RUSSELL RUSSELL RUSSELL

Find all the team-mate battle statistics for the 2019 season here!





Team Pace

As discussed earlier, it was the final sector where Ferrari gained time on Mercedes. Renault were today’s third fastest team. Though Red Bull were third fastest through the first and second sectors, they were beaten by both Renault and McLaren in the final part of the lap, the difference being enough to put Renault ahead overall. Further back, Racing Point were the second-slowest team in every sector, aside from the final sector where they were sixth quickest. For the seventh time in seven races, Williams were the slowest team in all three sectors – their best potential lap times being over three seconds off the pace of the polesitter.

  GAP TO
ULTIMATE PACE
GAP TO POLE
Ferrari 0.083 -0.016
Mercedes 0.234 0.135
Renault 0.829 0.73
Red Bull 0.864 0.765
McLaren 1.267 1.168
Haas 1.406 1.307
Toro Rosso 1.543 1.444
Alfa Romeo 1.782 1.683
Racing Point 1.796 1.697
Williams 3.362 3.263

About the above table: the ‘gap to ultimate pace’ column shows the gap between the team’s best three sector times added together and the overall best three sector times added together. The ‘gap to pole time’ column shows the gap between the team’s best three sector times added together and the lap time of the polesitter.


Improvements between 2018 and 2019

McLaren were the most improved team since last season, with their best potential lap being 1.320 seconds faster than their best potential lap time in 2018. Every team except Red Bull and Williams were ultimately faster than they were last season at the Canadian Grand Prix. You can see the full data below:

 20182019Difference
McLaren72.72871.408-1.32
Haas72.39871.547-0.851
Renault71.77670.97-0.806
Toro Rosso72.44371.684-0.759
Alfa Romeo72.60171.923-0.678
Ferrari70.67670.224-0.452
Mercedes70.80570.375-0.43
Racing Point71.98671.937-0.049
Red Bull70.89471.0050.111
Williams73.3573.5030.153

All set for Sunday:

Could this be a turning point of the 2019 season for Ferrari, or is it another false dawn? The run down to Turn 1 between Vettel, Hamilton and Leclerc will be fascinating. Behind that, what will Daniel Ricciardo be able to do from fourth on the grid? It’s Renault’s best qualifying position since Japan 2010! Both Valtteri Bottas and Max Verstappen are starting within the top ten but are out of position, which should give us some good action in the opening stages as the pair fight through the pack to get back to the front. Further back, Kevin Magnussen will be starting from the pit-lane following his Q2 crash – what will he be able to do from there? It looks set to be a very interesting Sunday afternoon in Montreal!

In the Lucky and Unlucky Grid Positions:

LUCKY:

Pole: Sebastian Vettel

4th: Daniel Ricciardo

6th: Valtteri Bottas 

7th: Nico Hulkenberg

UNLUCKY:

5th: Pierre Gasly

12th: Antonio Giovinazzi

16th: Kimi Raikkonen

17th: Lance Stroll

19th: Robert Kubica

Find out what makes each grid position lucky or unlucky here!

 






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